What is Child & Adolescent Psychotherapy?

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Child and adolescent therapy is a dynamic healing process guided by a therapist, with sessions and activities tailored to the child’s specific circumstances and unique means of expressing themselves.

 

The aim of the treatments is to help children and their families to better understand themselves and the difficulties they are facing, acquiring new skills and healthier coping mechanisms on the way. My psychodynamic approach seeks to look beneath the surface of problematic behaviours and instead focuses on children’s complex, and often hidden, emotional lives that trigger them to behave in certain ways.

 

A prerequisite of successful psychotherapy is creating a safe environment where the child can express even their most troubling thoughts. At its core, therefore, is establishing trust between client and therapist—and once our therapeutic alliance is formed, we work together to set realistic goals drawing on the child’s inner strength.

 

Some circumstances require that I see the child or young person individually, but other family members, especially the parents, are often asked to participate as well. Working together with the parents often promotes a deeper understanding of the child’s perspective and mental processes.

 

Activities during the sessions may vary according to the child’s developmental phase and interests—while younger children may be encouraged to play, older children are often asked to draw or paint. With teenagers, it is usually best to engage them in conversation and simply encourage them to talk about their experiences and how they feel those experiences affect them. The problems we identify along the way also shed light on other factors that may be affecting the child’s relationships, whether in the past or present. 

Who can benefit from therapy?

As a busy parent with a lot on your plate, it can be overwhelming to consider all of your child’s needs and wants. And while every child misbehaves from time to time, if a child has difficulty making friends or shows signs of anxiety or depression, it might be time to step in.

 

Unusual behaviours sometimes indicate more deeply rooted issues that a child cannot overcome on their own. Your child might be having trouble coping with illness or injury, struggle with peer/social pressure, or experience grief following a death, family breakdown, divorce, or other traumatic experience in their life.

 

Some children find it hard to express how they feel, and finding external support might be the best you can do for them. A trained therapist can give your child the confidence they need to overcome challenges in their lives and can provide much needed support for the family as well.  

 

As a busy parent with a lot on your plate it can be overwhelming to consider all of your child’s needs and wants. And while every child misbehaves from time to time, if a child has difficulty making friends or show signs of anxiety or depression, it might be time to step in.

 

Unusual behaviours sometimes indicate more deeply rooted issues that a child cannot overcome on their own. Your child might be having trouble coping with illness or injury, struggle with peer/social pressure, or experience grief following a death, family breakdown, divorce, or other traumatic experience in their life.

 

Some children find it hard to express how they feel, and finding external support might be the best you can do for them. A trained therapist can give your child the confidence they need to overcome challenges in their lives and can provide much needed support for the family as well.  

Benefit of child’s therapy?

As a busy parent with a lot on your plate it can be overwhelming to consider all of your child’s needs and wants. And while every child misbehaves from time to time, if a child has difficulty making friends or show signs of anxiety or depression, it might be time to step in.

 

Unusual behaviours sometimes indicate more deeply rooted issues that a child cannot overcome on their own. Your child might be having trouble coping with illness or injury, struggle with peer/social pressure, or experience grief following a death, family breakdown, divorce, or other traumatic experience in their life.

 

Some children find it hard to express how they feel, and finding external support might be the best you can do for them. A trained therapist can give your child the confidence they need to overcome challenges in their lives and can provide much needed support for the family as well.  

 

As a busy parent with a lot on your plate it can be overwhelming to consider all of your child’s needs and wants. And while every child misbehaves from time to time, if a child has difficulty making friends or show signs of anxiety or depression, it might be time to step in.

 

Unusual behaviours sometimes indicate more deeply rooted issues that a child cannot overcome on their own. Your child might be having trouble coping with illness or injury, struggle with peer/social pressure, or experience grief following a death, family breakdown, divorce, or other traumatic experience in their life.

 

Some children find it hard to express how they feel, and finding external support might be the best you can do for them. A trained therapist can give your child the confidence they need to overcome challenges in their lives and can provide much needed support for the family as well.  

Length of treatment

Child psychotherapy can last from seven sessions to two years, and it is not uncommon for young adults to return to therapy when they feel confused or in need of additional support.

 

Besides working with children individually, I also offer sessions for families who worry about their babies or young children. Parent support therapy can take place parallel to the child’s therapy.

Therapy sessions

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One-on-one therapy sessions last for 50 minutes, while family meetings are 1 to 1.5 hours long. I try to see children at the same time and in the same room every week. A predictable routine supports the work. 

 

Play therapy for young children and talking therapy for preteens and adolescents help the affected child to deal with the difficulties they are experiencing, and the practical coping skills they learn along the way make a world of difference for some of those conditions.

 

Sometimes children find it hard to communicate through words or play, and some do not have the language skills to convey their thoughts. For some, the traumatic events are too painful to recall and talk about. During the sessions I provide children with more adaptive ways to express themselves and process their feelings and also help parents to find ways to communicate with their children meaningfully.

2010 - present

2010 - present